Ashley Gilbertson on Photographing PTSD in NYC

Photographer Ashley Gilbertson talks to Chris Hondros talk on Dec. 6 in NYC about his recent projects photographing PTSD

http://groundview2.eventbrite.com/

The Epoch Times cordially invites you to attend an evening with Ashley Gilbertson, an award-winning war photographer and VII Network photographer who spent several years photographing the war in Iraq. He will discuss his recent projects documenting the affects of PTSD on soldiers returning home.

Chris Hondros, Senior Staff Photographer for Getty Images, will moderate the event.

This is part of a forum series called “Ground View,” intriguing and informative events featuring remarkable photojournalists who have witnessed some of the world’s most important news firsthand.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 6

6:30-8:30p.m.

NYU Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute

20 Cooper Square, 6th Floor, New York, NY

Slide show/Discussion begins at 6:30 pm, reception follows

**online registration only**

http://groundview2.eventbrite.com/

Ashley Gilbertson on photographing PTSD

Tim Hetherington in NYC Forum Dec. 8 at NYU

Register to see Tim Hetherington in NYC on Dec. 8 here

The Epoch Times cordially invites you to attend an evening with Tim Hetherington, an award-winning photojournalist and filmmaker. He will discuss his new book, Long Story Bit By Bit: Liberia Retold, as well as his upcoming documentary about a platoon of U.S. Airborne soldiers in Afghanistan. A book signing and reception will follow the event.

This is the inaugural Ground View forum, the first in a series of intriguing and informative events featuring journalists who have witnessed some of the world’s most important news firsthand.

Hetherington’s upcoming documentary, entitled Restrepo, was just accepted into the Sundance Film Festival.

Register to see Tim Hetherington in NYC on Dec. 8 here

NYC Forum to Feature Tim Hetherington

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT TIM HETHERINGTON AND HIS UPCOMING TALK IN NEW YORK

Attend an evening with Tim Hetherington, an award-winning photojournalist and filmmaker on Tuesday, Dec. 8. He will discuss his new book, Long Story Bit By Bit: Liberia Retold, as well as his upcoming documentary about a platoon of U.S. Airborne soldiers in Afghanistan. A book signing and reception will follow the event

This is the inaugural Ground View forum, the first in a series of intriguing and informative events featuring journalists who have witnessed some of the world’s most important news firsthand.

Location: NYU Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute

20 Cooper Square, 6th Floor, New York, NY

Time: Slide show/Discussion/6:30 pm

Book signing and reception to follow

Admission: General Admission $12.00

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT TIM HETHERINGTON AND HIS UPCOMING TALK IN NEW YORK

Journalists Recall Fall of Berlin Wall

by Genevieve Long for The Epoch Times

NEW YORK—Twenty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, several journalists who were there reminisced on witnessing history. During a forum at the German House in New York, they shared memories of the mood at the moment in history when the barrier between East and West Germany was shattered.

Tim Aeppel is a foreign correspondent based in Bonn, Germany, and covered the events before and after the fall of the wall for The Wall Street Journal. Aeppel was at Checkpoint Charlie in East Berlin on the night of Nov. 9, 1989 with East Germans.

Aeppel recalled that at one point, the border guards started handing out cards to a crowd of over 700 that had gathered. The crowd threw the cards on the ground in defiance, finally fed up.

“I realized that was a turning point,” said Mr. Aeppel, who was awake for the next 48 hours following the story. “The crowd was firm, but they weren’t hostile.”

The sheer historical significance of what was unfolding wasn’t lost on Aeppel.

“As a journalist this was the biggest thing I could have been covering other than a war,” he said.

Michael Meyer, who was also at Checkpoint Charlie that night, said there were moments of uncertainty about whether things would turn violent.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE ABOUT JOURNALISTS WITNESSING THE FALL OF THE BERLIN WALL ONLINE AT THE EPOCH TIMES

My American Dream

By Genevieve Long

It has always been drilled into my head that voting is a civic duty. As Americans, we are told it is our privilege to walk into a booth and choose a candidate. But until November 4, 2008, I never really believed it.

I think my enthusiasm started with unusual cab rides I started having six months ago. As soon as I shut the door and gave my destination, the drivers would start chattering at me enthusiastically.

“So what do you think?” my driver from Egypt or Eritrea or India would ask, nearly yelling. “You think Obama can do it? Who do you like?” I would sit in the back of the cab, caught halfway between speechless and thrilled, seeing my country take a personal interest in who should run our government.

My favorite was a Muslim driver wearing an Islamic cap, who hailed from somewhere in the Middle East.

“Do you know the meaning of the word democracy?” he screamed conversationally as he careened down 10th Avenue, barely minding the treacherous street construction and oncoming traffic. He explained his definition in minute detail, replete with obscure historical references and personal philosophical nuances.

I was shocked to learn that his understanding of the word democracy had nothing to do with a government of the people. It was all about power and justification of acts of power—extremely complicated and far removed from the American ideal of the word and the concept. But maybe we were to blame for the distortion. After all, we have seen years of war in Iraq and Afghanistan, a devastated economy, a mortgage crisis, and on and on. And all the while, so many struggling to have some control that is held by so few. Over the last few years, it has started to seem like our form of democracy is more about power, and less about people.

Today when I finally went to vote after two years of campaigns and promises, I thought about that cab driver and his definition of democracy. All day I had been excited about casting my ballot in what many Americans feel is an historic election. It is something I want to tell my children and grandchildren about. Not simply for the sake of the story, but to hand down to future generations a genuine love of freedom. My parents passed it to me, as their parents to them. That belief in the ability to make things better is the heart of my American dream. It has given me hope over some of the dark moments of the last eight years.

Most of my friends, colleagues, and family members asked and reminded and cajoled me to vote. Immigrants I know who cannot cast a ballot yet because of their status expressed regret that they cannot participate. Overall, it has been quite a buildup.

As I strode toward my polling place in New York City with a smile, I felt genuinely excited for the first time in my life about voting. Out of the blue, I thought about Iraq and a passage from Dexter Filkins’ book, “The Forever War”. In the book, Filkins describes an Iraqi man at the polling station in Iraq who said, “Get out of my way—I want to vote.” I suddenly understood how that man must have felt. If given the chance, human beings naturally want a say in their fate. On voting day, that manifests as using our one voice to state who we want to lead us.

But at the end of the day when the voices have been counted, the newly elected leader is still just a leader. They are one person and the civic duty of the citizens has just begun. If we have learned anything from the past eight years, it is that an engaged, questioning, and probing citizenry is core to the health of a democracy—regardless of who is elected to lead. The change we seek will not be found in one person, it will ultimately be found in ourselves.

As I approached the polling station and saw the sign stating, “Vote Here/Vota Aqui”, the immortal words of Abraham Lincoln in his Gettysburg Address came to mind:This nation shall have a new birth of freedom; and that this government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

Happy birthday, Constitution, with special thanks for your First Amendment

Courtesy of the Society of Professional Journalists:

SO WE NEVER FORGET. . .
Michigan high school journalists rallied Wednesday on the steps of the state
Capitol to celebrate Constitution Day and promote legislative efforts to pass a student
press rights law. Joining the students was Mary Beth Tinker, who was among plaintiffs in the landmark Tinker v. Des Moines ruling that declared students don't lose their First Amendment rights at the
schoolhouse gate. The event was supported by the Michigan Interscholastic Press Association and SPJ's Detroit and Mid-Michigan chapters.